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    Beautiful Val St Lambert crystal lamp
    Beautiful Val St Lambert crystal lamp
    300  200 

    Beautiful Val St Lambert crystal lamp

    , ,
    Spectacular table lamp signed Val Saint Lambert. This hand-made piece is made in the 1960s by the most prominent crystal manufacturer in Benelux, official supplier to H.M. the King of Belgium. Signed on the bottom, "Val St. Lambert". Still has the original label. The piece is in a very good condition. History of Val St. Lambert: In June 1826, smoke was rising from the chimney of the Cistercian abbey in Seraing, near Liège: the first furnace of the Val Saint Lambert Crystal Works had just been fired up. Val Saint Lambert would rapidly emerge as the epicentre of the Belgian crystal industry. For all the preconditions for a successful industry were met: the vicinity to the Meuse, a coal-rich region, a rail network, and even the enormous monastery facilities, which were ideally suited for artistic and craft activities on a large scale. The end of the 19th century ushered in a golden age for Val Saint Lambert. The site around the former abbey expanded into an impressive village with more than 180 worker dwellings, with small gardens, a school, a shop, and even a hospital. In the crystal works, by now world famous, some 5,000 employees produced 120,000 unique crystal creations each day. World War I brought an abrupt end to the expansion. Several key markets disappeared: the Balkans, the Russian tsars and Germany. The great depression of 1929 and the bombardment of World War II meant a further decline for the crystal works. This situation lasted up to the 1960s and 1970s, before two major innovations breathed new life into Val Saint Lambert: the introduction of the diamond disc for better cutting and engraving, and the replacement of the traditional pot furnace by a bath furnace, which melted solid raw materials into liquid glass. From the 1970s the company’s history is marked by several restructurings and takeovers. Today, the Val Saint Lambert Crystal Works are in the hands of the Onclin family, which aspires to reinstate the brand on a global level. Source: val-saint-lambert.com
    300  200 
    300  200 
  • Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s
    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s
    30 

    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s

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    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s. Nicely colored in an exquisite purple shade, the bowl features a "half an apple" shape, which has been very popular in Murano since the second half of the 1950s. The bowl is in very good vintage condition. During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past. Source: glassofvenice.com
    30 
    30 
  • Sold out
    Art Deco armchair made by Jindrich Halabala for UP Zavody, 1950s
    350  200 

    Art Deco armchair made by Jindrich Halabala for UP Zavody, 1950s

    Elegant and exquisite Art Deco armchair made by Jindrich Halabala for UP Zavody, Czechoslovakia, in the 1950s. Halabala, one of the "Modern classics", was the director and chief architect of UP Zavody. The factory was considered - during the 1950s and 1960s - the largest furniture manufacturers in Europe. This armchair features both the geometrical lines of an Art Deco item and the clean shapes and honest philosophy of the Modern design. The armchair have recently been restored and have new upholstery.
    350  200 
    350  200 
  • Sold out
    Pair of chairs manufactured in France
    Pair of chairs manufactured in France
    200  100 

    Pair of chairs manufactured in France

    Beautiful pair of chairs made in France, in the 1960s. The structure, made of walnut, is very elegant and reminiscent of Art Deco current. The front legs, cone-shaped, have brass clogs. The chairs were re-upholstered in the spirit of the period and are in excellent condition.
    200  100 
    200  100 
  • Sold out
    Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s
    Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s
    75 

    Murano sommerso vase from the 1950s

    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in green and purple. The piece is made in the 1950s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. It has the original label. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    75 
    75 
  • Sold out
    Beautiful Val St Lambert crystal lamp
    Beautiful Val St Lambert crystal lamp
    200 

    Exquisite Val St Lambert crystal lamp

    Exquisite table lamp signed Val Saint Lambert. This hand-made piece is made in the 1960s by the most prominent crystal manufacturer in Benelux, official supplier to H.M. the King of Belgium. Signed on the bottom, "Val St. Lambert". Still has the original label. The piece is in a very good condition. History of Val St. Lambert: In June 1826, smoke was rising from the chimney of the Cistercian abbey in Seraing, near Liège: the first furnace of the Val Saint Lambert Crystal Works had just been fired up. Val Saint Lambert would rapidly emerge as the epicentre of the Belgian crystal industry. For all the preconditions for a successful industry were met: the vicinity to the Meuse, a coal-rich region, a rail network, and even the enormous monastery facilities, which were ideally suited for artistic and craft activities on a large scale. The end of the 19th century ushered in a golden age for Val Saint Lambert. The site around the former abbey expanded into an impressive village with more than 180 worker dwellings, with small gardens, a school, a shop, and even a hospital. In the crystal works, by now world famous, some 5,000 employees produced 120,000 unique crystal creations each day. World War I brought an abrupt end to the expansion. Several key markets disappeared: the Balkans, the Russian tsars and Germany. The great depression of 1929 and the bombardment of World War II meant a further decline for the crystal works. This situation lasted up to the 1960s and 1970s, before two major innovations breathed new life into Val Saint Lambert: the introduction of the diamond disc for better cutting and engraving, and the replacement of the traditional pot furnace by a bath furnace, which melted solid raw materials into liquid glass. From the 1970s the company’s history is marked by several restructurings and takeovers. Today, the Val Saint Lambert Crystal Works are in the hands of the Onclin family, which aspires to reinstate the brand on a global level. Source: val-saint-lambert.com
    200 
    200 

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