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Glass & ceramics are widely used for making household utensils. Apart from making household materials, glass & ceramics have found their place in many areas. Glass can be called as a type of ceramic. Glass is known to be a non-crystalline material. It is an amorphous solid, which means that it has no long-range order of positioning of its molecules. Ceramic can be termed as an inorganic material. Unlike glass, ceramics may have crystalline or partly crystalline structures. Ceramics may also be amorphous. Glass & ceramics are brittle and break at the instance of a small force. Glass is also transparent, which means light passes through it. Ceramics may be opaque, which means it does not allow light to pass through it. The earliest ceramic products were pottery made out of clay. The history of glass dates back to 3500 BC in Mesopotamia. The term Glass was first developed during the late Roman empire. Ceramics comes from Greek word keramikos, which means pottery and keramos, which means potter’s clay. Ceramics are hard, brittle, oxidation resistant, wear-resistant, thermal and electrical insulating, refractory, nonmagnetic, chemically stable and prone to thermal shock (differencebetween.net)

  • Set of two opaline cups made in Belgium, in the 1970s

    Set of two opaline cups made in Belgium, in the 1970s

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    Set of two beautiful ice cream (or sherbet) cups made of glass and opaline and produced in Belgium, in the 1970s. Colored in bright vivid orange, this cups features the Atomic Age aesthetics. The cups are in very good vintage shape. Atomic Age in design refers to the period roughly corresponding to 1940–1960 and extending in the 1970s, when concerns about nuclear war dominated Western society during the Cold War. The discovery and development of the Electron microscope had also a huge impact. Architecture, industrial design, commercial design (including advertising), interior design, and fine arts were all influenced by the themes of atomic science, as well as the Space Age, which coincided with that period. Atomic Age design became popular and instantly recognizable, with a use of atomic motifs and space age symbols. Retrofuturism is a current resurgence of interest in Atomic Age design. Free-form organic shapes also appear as a recurring theme in Atomic Age design, reflecting x-ray technology that was becoming more widespread and familiar in pop culture. These botanic designs influenced later Atomic Age patterns that included repeating organic shapes similar to cells and organisms viewed through a microscope. Vital forms, or abstract organic forms, were identified as a core motif.
    60 
  • Signed Daum Nancy crystal ashtray from the 1960s
    Signed Daum Nancy crystal ashtray from the 1960s

    Signed Daum Nancy crystal ashtray from the 1960s

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    Spectacular crystal ashtray signed by Daum Nancy and made in France, in the 1960s. The translucent emerald color and the flower-shaped line give this piece a refined, elegant and discreet look. It’s signed on the bottom "Daun Nancy" – Cross of Lorraine – "France", in the typical manner of this famous manufacturer. Also retains the label of the first crystal shop that sold it: "Cristallerie Moser-Millot Paris 30 Bd. Des Italiens". Is in a very good condition, with minimal age related signs. Daum Nancy rose to prominence during the Art Nouveau and Art Deco period, and captured the imagination of collectors all over the world. Let us take a quick look at the interesting events that shaped the company. Jean Daum was a notary from Bitche who had lent some money to the proprietors of a glass factory in Nancy, the capital town of the French region of Lorraine. The glassworks was then named "Verrerie Sainte Catherine". In 1878, Daum took over the factory when its erstwhile owners were unable to pay off their debt and renamed it "Verrerie de Nancy". The factory initially produced glassware such as drinking glasses and pitchers and then ventured into artistic glass manufacturing in 1891. After Daum’s death in 1885, his son Auguste Daum took over the control of the company in the year 1890. The Daum brothers exhibited their "Handsome Tavern Glass" at the Paris International Exhibition in 1889. This event was of utmost significance because it marked the birth of the French Art Nouveau movement. Daum received his first "Grand Prix" in 1900 because by then his factory had established its name as a producer of high quality glass. By 1903, Daum had started making vitrified vases. These vases are singularly responsible for the kind of fame the company acquired in the early 1900s. In 1906 Daum began the manufacture of pâte-de-verre, a glass-making technique first used over five thousand years ago in the early world. In order to understand the collector’s interest in Daum Nancy objects, one must realize that this company has shaped itself up to become a producer of glass art objects and not simple glassworks. It pioneered and revolutionized old techniques by working with colour powders, acids, enamel and fluorine hydrogen. From the early 1900s emphasis was placed upon ornamental motifs in naturalistic forms. When Galle died in 1904, the Daum brothers became the leaders in the field of decorative glass and their dominance lasted for one productive, golden decade. Source: artnewsnviews.com
    150 
  • Smoky Selandia dish by Per Lütken
    Smoky Selandia dish by Per Lütken

    Smoky Selandia dish by Per Lütken

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    Selandia was designed by Per Lütken in the spring of 1957. The dish was fashioned by hand, and its shape is created when the glass blower carefully turns, raises and lowers the hot glass. The visual softness contained in the glass at 1400 degrees Celsius can be seen directly in the cooled, transparent version of the dish. The dish is decorated by engraving/glass cutting. Identified and dated on the bottom, “Holmegaard 19PL59” (Per Lütken signed almost always monogrammed with initials falling between the 4 digits of the year).
    300 
  • “Teardrop” Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s

    “Teardrop” Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s

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    Spectacular Murano sommerso vase for one flower (soliflore) in shades of red (the interior layer), yellow (the median layer) and blue (the outer layer). Because of its shape, this type of vase is also known as "Teardrop". The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. It has its original label. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    100 
  • Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow
    Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow

    Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow

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    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow. The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    55 
  • Arkipelago candlestik, designed by Timo Sarpaneva for Iittala
    Arkipelago candlestik, designed by Timo Sarpaneva for Iittala

    Arkipelago candlestik, designed by Timo Sarpaneva for Iittala

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    The "Arkipelago" candlesticks, designed by Timo Sarpaneva for Iittala, were produced in different sizes and were created from the very beginning to be collected. Precisely to give them a high degree of preciousness, the glass is hand-molded. Timo Tapani Sarpaneva (31 October 1926 – 6 October 2006) was an influential Finnish designer, sculptor, and educator best known in the art world for innovative work in glass, which often merged attributes of display art objects with utilitarian designations. While glass remained his most commonly addressed medium, he worked with metal, wood, textiles, and porcelain (china). Sarpaneva has entered homes around the world through his industrial design of upscale, artistically conceived items, including cast-iron cookware and porcelain dinnerware. His work was among the key components that helped to launch Finland's reputation as a trailblazer of design. Sarpaneva's first international recognition in glass work came with a Grand Prix from the Milan Triennale in 1954 that included Sarpaneva's series Orkidea ("Orchid"), Kajakki ("Kayak"), and Lansetti ("Lancet") adopted for production by Iittala. Iittala, founded as a glassworks in 1881, is a Finnish design brand specialising in design objects, tableware and cookware. Iittala's official i-logo was designed by Timo Sarpaneva in 1956. Iittala has strong design roots in glasswares and art glass which can be seen in, for example, the early designs of Aino Aalto glasses designed by Aino Aalto in 1932; Alvar Aalto’s Savoy Vase (Aalto Vase) from 1936; Oiva Toikka’s Birds by Toikka glass birds collection that has been made since 1962, his glassware set Kastehelmi from 1964 and Tapio Wirkkala’s glasses Ultima Thule from 1968. Iittala is the world's most famous glass company in the whole world. Over time, Iittala has expanded from glass to other materials, such as ceramics and metal while keeping with their key philosophy of progressive elegant and timeless design, such as Kaj Franck’s Teema ceramic tableware from 1952 and Timo Sarpaneva’s cast iron pot Sarpaneva from 1960. Iittala focuses on timeless design which can be seen not only in older creations but in the modern classics such as cookware Tools designed by Björn Dahlström in 1998 and Heikki Orvola’s Kivi candleholders from 1988. Source: wikipedia.org
    20 
  • Iittala fruit bowl made in the 1970s
    Iittala fruit bowl made in the 1970s

    Iittala fruit bowl made in the 1970s

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    Beautiful and elegant fruit bowl designed by Tapio Wirkkala and made by Iittala in the 1970s. Tapio Veli Ilmari Wirkkala (2 June 1915, Hanko – 19 May 1985) was a Finnish designer and sculptor, a major figure of post-war design. His work ranges from plastic ketchup bottles and metalware to glass, ceramics and plywood in a range of styles. He designed the Finnish markka banknotes introduced in 1955. His range was immense, designing glassware, stoneware, jewelry, and furniture for mass production, as well as individual sculptures in several media. Among his most famous works have been the design for the Finlandia vodka bottle (1970-2000) and for Iittala's Ultima Thule set of kitchen glasses. Both glassware items feature a dripping icicle look, and in the case of Iittala's popular glassware it is said to have taken thousands of hours to develop a glassblowing technique that would produce the effect. Wirkkala did much of his initial design work using a traditional Finnish carving knife, the puukko. Wirkkala designed his own version of the knife. The Tapio Wirkkala Puukko was built by Hackman Cutlery and marketed by Brookstone in the US in the early-1970s. Iittala, founded as a glassworks in 1881, is a Finnish design brand specialising in design objects, tableware and cookware. Iittala's official i-logo was designed by Timo Sarpaneva in 1956. Iittala has strong design roots in glasswares and art glass which can be seen in, for example, the early designs of Aino Aalto glasses designed by Aino Aalto in 1932; Alvar Aalto’s Savoy Vase (Aalto Vase) from 1936; Oiva Toikka’s Birds by Toikka glass birds collection that has been made since 1962, his glassware set Kastehelmi from 1964 and Tapio Wirkkala’s glasses Ultima Thule from 1968. Iittala is the world's most famous glass company in the whole world. Over time, Iittala has expanded from glass to other materials, such as ceramics and metal while keeping with their key philosophy of progressive elegant and timeless design, such as Kaj Franck’s Teema ceramic tableware from 1952 and Timo Sarpaneva’s cast iron pot Sarpaneva from 1960. Iittala focuses on timeless design which can be seen not only in older creations but in the modern classics such as cookware Tools designed by Björn Dahlström in 1998 and Heikki Orvola’s Kivi candleholders from 1988. Source: wikipedia.org
    60 
  • Green & brown Murano fruit bowl made in the 1950s
    Green & brown Murano fruit bowl made in the 1950s

    Green & brown Murano fruit bowl made in the 1950s

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    Green & brown Murano fruit bowl made in the 1950s. Of considerable size and, at the same time, remarked by the suppleness of its lines and silhouette, this fruit bowl (kept in very good vintage condition) can successfully be the central piece of any table. During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past. Source: glassofvenice.com
    110 
  • Beautiful smoky ashtray by Per Lütken
    Beautiful smoky ashtray by Per Lütken

    Beautiful smoky ashtray by Per Lütken

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    Beautiful smoky ashtray designed by Per Lütken for Holmegaard (although it can also be used as a bowl for peanuts or candies). Signed, identified and dated on the bottom, “Holmegaard 19PL57” (Per Lütken signed almost always monogrammed with initials falling between the 4 digits of the year).
    55 
  • Ultima Thule bowl, designed by Tapio Wirkkala for Iittala
    Ultima Thule bowl, designed by Tapio Wirkkala for Iittala

    Ultima Thule bowl, designed by Tapio Wirkkala for Iittala

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    Inspired by the melting ice in Lapland, the Ultima Thule series is design legend Tapio Wirkkala’s most famous work. Wirkkala originally created the surface of Ultima Thule in the 1960s after carving into a graphic mold. Ultima Thule is an exclusive design which reflects the thousands of hours spent perfecting the glass-blowing technique required to produce the effect. Tapio Veli Ilmari Wirkkala (2 June 1915, Hanko – 19 May 1985) was a Finnish designer and sculptor, a major figure of post-war design. His work ranges from plastic ketchup bottles and metalware to glass, ceramics and plywood in a range of styles. He designed the Finnish markka banknotes introduced in 1955. His range was immense, designing glassware, stoneware, jewelry, and furniture for mass production, as well as individual sculptures in several media. Among his most famous works have been the design for the Finlandia vodka bottle (1970-2000) and for Iittala's Ultima Thule set of kitchen glasses. Both glassware items feature a dripping icicle look, and in the case of Iittala's popular glassware it is said to have taken thousands of hours to develop a glassblowing technique that would produce the effect. Wirkkala did much of his initial design work using a traditional Finnish carving knife, the puukko. Wirkkala designed his own version of the knife. The Tapio Wirkkala Puukko was built by Hackman Cutlery and marketed by Brookstone in the US in the early-1970s. Iittala, founded as a glassworks in 1881, is a Finnish design brand specialising in design objects, tableware and cookware. Iittala's official i-logo was designed by Timo Sarpaneva in 1956. Iittala has strong design roots in glasswares and art glass which can be seen in, for example, the early designs of Aino Aalto glasses designed by Aino Aalto in 1932; Alvar Aalto’s Savoy Vase (Aalto Vase) from 1936; Oiva Toikka’s Birds by Toikka glass birds collection that has been made since 1962, his glassware set Kastehelmi from 1964 and Tapio Wirkkala’s glasses Ultima Thule from 1968. Iittala is the world's most famous glass company in the whole world. Over time, Iittala has expanded from glass to other materials, such as ceramics and metal while keeping with their key philosophy of progressive elegant and timeless design, such as Kaj Franck’s Teema ceramic tableware from 1952 and Timo Sarpaneva’s cast iron pot Sarpaneva from 1960. Iittala focuses on timeless design which can be seen not only in older creations but in the modern classics such as cookware Tools designed by Björn Dahlström in 1998 and Heikki Orvola’s Kivi candleholders from 1988. Source: wikipedia.org
    30 
  • Beautiful Akva ashtray for two, by Per Lütken
    Beautiful Akva ashtray for two, by Per Lütken

    Beautiful Akva ashtray for two, by Per Lütken

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    Beautiful Akva ashtray for two designed by Per Lütken for Holmegaard. This model is part of the Akva series, which was a huge success and remained in production for more than two decades between 1953 and 1974. A rare piece made from hand-blown glass. The Akva series includes items sold under different trade marks and line names: Askebaeger, Dukling, Fiona, Hellas, Lysestage, Menuet, Rondo, Selandia, Thule, Umanak, Surf etc.
    50 
  • Imposing emerald fruit bowl made in Murano in the 1970s

    Imposing emerald fruit bowl made in Murano in the 1970s

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    Imposing emerald fruit bowl made in Murano in the 1970s. This tall, massive, beautifully colored piece is in very good vintage condition, showing no visible defects. During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past. Source: glassofvenice.com
    100 
  • Green bullicante Murano ashtray
    Green bullicante Murano ashtray

    Green bullicante Murano ashtray

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    Beautiful controlled bubbles (bullicante) ashtray made of glass in Murano, Italy, in the 1960s. Hand blown, this pice features the shape of a flower in an amazing shade of translucent emerald green. The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects. The “bullicante” effect is amongst the most famous glass making techniques and it is seen quite often around the island of Murano. If you’ve had the fortune of strolling along the streets of Venice, you would have noticed beautiful glass pieces with small air bubbles trapped in the inside, possibly stopping to wonder how that seemingly impossible effect is achieved. This peculiar effect is obtained by placing a piece of molten glass inside a metallic mold with spikes, very much resembling a pineapple’s texture. These spikes cause small holes on the surface creating a pattern all around the glass piece. After it’s been left to cool down for a few moments, the whole piece is submerged in molten glass again. This second layer completely covers the first one. However, thanks to the thick consistency of glass, the holes previously impressed on the first layer are not covered, thus causing air to be trapped between both layers of glass. This process can be repeated several times, creating a pattern as complicated as the glass master wishes. This technique gives not only a sense of depth to the whole object, but also an incomparable decorative effect, famous for its originality. Source: glassofvenice.com
    55 
  • Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s
    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s

    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s

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    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s. Nicely colored in an exquisite purple shade, the bowl features a "half an apple" shape, which has been very popular in Murano since the second half of the 1950s. The bowl is in very good vintage condition. During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past. Source: glassofvenice.com
    30 
  • Kekkerit bowl, designed by Timo Sarpaneva for Iittala
    Kekkerit bowl, designed by Timo Sarpaneva for Iittala

    Kekkerit bowl, designed by Timo Sarpaneva for Iittala

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    Beautiful Kekkerit bowl designed by Timo Sarpaneva for Iittala. The stunning Kekkerit (which, incidentally, means party in Finnish) range, also referred to as Finlandia or Moukku, was designed in 1970. Crafted of fine crystal, this highly textured vase literally sparkles with an amazing ice like quality. This piece looks as if it has been carved from glacial ice. The impressive bark like texture, high quality crystal and stunning pattern make this superb piece a truly iconic timeless design. Timo Tapani Sarpaneva (31 October 1926 – 6 October 2006) was an influential Finnish designer, sculptor, and educator best known in the art world for innovative work in glass, which often merged attributes of display art objects with utilitarian designations. While glass remained his most commonly addressed medium, he worked with metal, wood, textiles, and porcelain (china). Sarpaneva has entered homes around the world through his industrial design of upscale, artistically conceived items, including cast-iron cookware and porcelain dinnerware. His work was among the key components that helped to launch Finland's reputation as a trailblazer of design. Sarpaneva's first international recognition in glass work came with a Grand Prix from the Milan Triennale in 1954 that included Sarpaneva's series Orkidea ("Orchid"), Kajakki ("Kayak"), and Lansetti ("Lancet") adopted for production by Iittala. Iittala, founded as a glassworks in 1881, is a Finnish design brand specialising in design objects, tableware and cookware. Iittala's official i-logo was designed by Timo Sarpaneva in 1956. Iittala has strong design roots in glasswares and art glass which can be seen in, for example, the early designs of Aino Aalto glasses designed by Aino Aalto in 1932; Alvar Aalto’s Savoy Vase (Aalto Vase) from 1936; Oiva Toikka’s Birds by Toikka glass birds collection that has been made since 1962, his glassware set Kastehelmi from 1964 and Tapio Wirkkala’s glasses Ultima Thule from 1968. Iittala is the world's most famous glass company in the whole world. Over time, Iittala has expanded from glass to other materials, such as ceramics and metal while keeping with their key philosophy of progressive elegant and timeless design, such as Kaj Franck’s Teema ceramic tableware from 1952 and Timo Sarpaneva’s cast iron pot Sarpaneva from 1960. Iittala focuses on timeless design which can be seen not only in older creations but in the modern classics such as cookware Tools designed by Björn Dahlström in 1998 and Heikki Orvola’s Kivi candleholders from 1988. Source: wikipedia.org
    70 
  • Beautiful Næbvase (Duckling or Beak vase) by Per Lütken
    Beautiful Næbvase (Duckling or Beak vase) by Per Lütken

    Beautiful Næbvase (Duckling or Beak vase) by Per Lütken

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    Spectacular vase from the famous Næbvase (Duckling or Beak vase) series, signed by Per Lütken and produced at Holmegaard. A very exquisite piece, which was appreciated since the beginning for its supple, organic and soft shape. Signed, identified and dated on the bottom, “Holmegaard 19PL55” (Per Lütken signed almost always monogrammed with initials falling between the 4 digits of the year). The Næbvase (Duckling or Beak vase) series was in production between 1952 and 1974.
    100 
  • Green and brown bowl made in Murano, in the 1950s
    Green and brown bowl made in Murano, in the 1950s

    Green and brown bowl made in Murano, in the 1950s

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    Beautiful geode bowl made in Murano, Italy, in the 1950s. Nicely colored, in shades of brown and green, this is a hand blown piece kept in very good vintage condition. Murano glass Geode bowls earn the name "geodes" due to their resemblance to geode rocks - rocks or stones that have been sliced neatly in two. The geode bowls therefore have a perfectly flat, wide rim. Murano glass geodes consist of two or more layers of cased glass. They were made my several Italian glass manufacturers from the Venetian island of Murano, and as such it is virtually impossible to identify the maker of an unmarked bowl. Popular geode shapes include circular, square, triangular, figure eight, and kidney shaped among others. Source: 20thcenturyglass.com
    50 
  • Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green

    Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green

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    Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green. This piece is remarkable in its fluid shapes, the zoomorphic look (seen from the top, it resembles the image of a cat's head), the fine quality of the glass, and the dialogue between the three differently colored compartments. Hand blown, this piece is kept in very good vintage condition. The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects. Source: glassofvenice.com
    45 
  • Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s
    Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s

    Murano sommerso vase from the 1950s

    ,
    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in green and purple. The piece is made in the 1950s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. It has the original label. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    75 
  • Bubbles orchid vase by Per Lütken
    Bubbles orchid vase by Per Lütken

    Bubbles orchid vase by Per Lütken

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    Exquisite Bubbles orchid vase (soliflore, or one flower vase) designed by Per Lütken and made at Holmegaard in 1951. Resembling a flower bulb, the base is executed in the controlled bubbles technique. This slim, minimalist and elegant vase quickly became an icon of Danish Mid-Century glass design. The model was later reproduced by other factories in Scandinavia, especially by the Swedes from Kosta and from Åseda.
    30 
  • Beautiful Murano sommerso vase
    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase

    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase

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    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in red and blue. The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    110 
  • Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s
    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s

    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s

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    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray made of glass. The piece is distinguished by its fluid shapes, by the fine quality of the glass, as well as by its intense and extremely beautiful ruby red color. Hand blown, this piece is kept in very good vintage condition. The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects. Source: glassofvenice.com
    45 
  • Controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray
    Controlled bubbles (bullincante) Murano ashtray

    Controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray

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    Beautiful controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray made of glass. Hand blown, this piece displays a nice chromatic effect and goes from dark green (to the rim) to clear white (at the bottom). The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects. The “bullicante” effect is amongst the most famous glass making techniques and it is seen quite often around the island of Murano. If you’ve had the fortune of strolling along the streets of Venice, you would have noticed beautiful glass pieces with small air bubbles trapped in the inside, possibly stopping to wonder how that seemingly impossible effect is achieved. This peculiar effect is obtained by placing a piece of molten glass inside a metallic mold with spikes, very much resembling a pineapple’s texture. These spikes cause small holes on the surface creating a pattern all around the glass piece. After it’s been left to cool down for a few moments, the whole piece is submerged in molten glass again. This second layer completely covers the first one. However, thanks to the thick consistency of glass, the holes previously impressed on the first layer are not covered, thus causing air to be trapped between both layers of glass. This process can be repeated several times, creating a pattern as complicated as the glass master wishes. This technique gives not only a sense of depth to the whole object, but also an incomparable decorative effect, famous for its originality. Source: glassofvenice.com
    40 
  • Beautiful Akva Surf ashtray by Per Lütken

    Beautiful Akva Surf ashtray by Per Lütken

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    Beautiful Akva surf ashtray designed by Per Lütken for Holmegaard (although it can also be used as a bowl for peanuts or candies). This model is part of the Akva series, which was a huge success and remained in production for more than two decades between 1953 and 1974. Signed, identified and dated on the bottom, “Holmegaard 19PL53” (Per Lütken signed almost always monogrammed with initials falling between the 4 digits of the year). A rare piece made from hand-blown glass. The Akva series includes items sold under different trade marks and line names: Askebaeger, Dukling, Fiona, Hellas, Lysestage, Menuet, Rondo, Selandia, Thule, Umanak, Surf etc. Being dated 1953 this vase was produced in the inaugural year of this series.
    50 
  • Sale
    Round Akva Askebæger bowl by Per Lütken
    Round Akva Askebæger bowl by Per Lütken

    Round Akva Askebæger bowl by Per Lütken

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    Aqua Askebæger designed by Per Lütken for Holmegaard. This model is part of the Akva series, which was a huge success and remained in production for more than two decades between 1953 and 1974. Signed, identified and dated on the bottom, “Holmegaard 19PL56” (Per Lütken signed almost always monogrammed with initials falling between the 4 digits of the year). Has a small chip on the rim and some age-related marks. However, all in all it is in a good vintage condition. A rare piece made from hand-blown glass. The Akva series includes items sold under different trade marks and line names: Askebaeger, Dukling, Fiona, Hellas, Lysestage, Menuet, Rondo, Selandia, Thule, Umanak, Surf etc.
    50  35 
  • Sale
    Little Akva bowl by Per Lütken
    Little Akva bowl by Per Lütken

    Little Akva Askebæger bowl by Per Lütken

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    Aqua bowl designed by Per Lütken for Holmegaard. This model is part of the Akva series, which was a huge success and remained in production for more than two decades between 1953 and 1974. Signed and identified on the bottom, “HOLMEGAARD PL”. Also on bottom has the production number, 15737. Has a small chip on the rim and some age-related marks. However, all in all it is in a good vintage condition. A rare piece made from hand-blown crystal (just a small part of this series was made from crystal and not from glass). The Akva series includes items sold under different trade marks and line names: Askebaeger, Dukling, Fiona, Hellas, Lysestage, Menuet, Rondo, Selandia, Thule, Umanak, Surf etc.
    50  35 

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