Please select a page for the Contact Slideout in Theme Options > Header Options

Ceramic orange glazed table lamp made in Denmark

Ceramic orange glazed table lamp made in Denmark

Ceramic orange glazed table lamp made in Denmark

NEW! Buy this item and earn 3 Fidelity Point(s) for a discount on a future purchase. (1 Fidelity Point = 1 Euro).

125  100 

Beautiful ceramic table lamp made in Denmark in the 1960s. The base lamp, made of ceramic, is distinguished by the play between the vivid orange glazed top and the naked clay (without glaze)  brown bottom. Both the color and the technique are specific to the period. The piece is kept in a very good condition, without visible defects and has all it’s original elements (lightbulb socket, switch, electric cord, plug).

In stock

000

You may also like

  • Sold out
    2.000  1.450 

    Beautiful Living Room set by Bruksbo Tegnekontor design studio

    2.000  1.450 

    Beautiful Living Room set by Bruksbo Tegnekontor design studio

    Beautiful Living Room set consisting of a sofa and two armchairs designed by the famous Bruksbo Tegnekontor design studio and made at Stranda Industri a/s in the 1960s. This set is the creation of Torbjørn Afdal, the most famous of their designers. The rosewood frame, the wide armrests, the minimalist outline, all are typical for his style. Both the sofa and the armchairs have their original upholstery. [spb_products title="Items in this bundle:" asset_type="selected-products" products="21214,21201" display_type="standard" display_layout="standard" multi_masonry="no" carousel="yes" fullwidth="no" columns="2" item_count="8" order="DESC" button_enabled="no" width="1/1" el_position="first last"]
    2.000  1.450 
  • Sold out
    Space Age table lamp made in Germany, in the 1960s
    75 

    Space Age table lamp made in Germany, in the 1960s

    75 

    Space Age table lamp made in Germany, in the 1960s

    Beautiful Space Age table lamp made in Germany, in the mid 20th century. The base of the lamp, resembling the fins of a rocket are made of beige plastic. The lightshade, made of dark brown bakelite also features an aerodynamic shape. Made in the 1960s, this is a representative piece fort the aesthetics of the Space Race era. The Space Age is a time period encompassing the activities related to the Space Race, space exploration, space technology, and the cultural developments influenced by these events. The Space Age is generally considered to have begun with Sputnik (1957). During the 1950s, architecture, furniture, interior design, cars, and gadget design took on a curiously spaceflight-inspired aesthetic.
    75 

Additional information

Design Period

1960-1969

Country of Origin

Condition

Flawless. This vintage item is in its original state. It has no defects and no restorations

Material(s)

,

Color(s)

,

Lightbulb Socket(s)

1 x Edison Screw (E27 or ES) lightbulb

Plug/Outlet Type

European plug (up to 240V), Type C plug (also compatible with Type E & F outlets)

Electrics

Cord length: 220 cm, Original lightbulb sockets, Original plug, Original switch

Weight

2700 g

Dimensions

Lamp base diameter = 14 cm, Lamp base height = 44,5 cm, Lampshade diameter = 40 cm (base), Total height = 50 cm

Duties Notice

If your delivery address is not in the European Union, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, or Switzerland, please be advised that import duty is not included in the prices you see online

Product Enquiry

About Mid-Century

A ceramic is an inorganic, non-metallic, solid material comprising metal, non-metal or metalloid atoms primarily held in ionic and covalent bonds. This article gives an overview of these materials from the point of view of materials science.

The crystallinity of this materials ranges from highly oriented to semi-crystalline, vitrified, and often completely amorphous (e.g., glasses). Most often, fired ceramics are either vitrified or semi-vitrified as is the case with earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain. Varying crystallinity and electron consumption in the ionic and covalent bonds cause most of there materials to be good thermal and electrical insulators (extensively researched in ceramic engineering). With such a large range of possible options for the composition/structure (e.g. nearly all of the elements, nearly all types of bonding, and all levels of crystallinity), the breadth of the subject is vast, and identifiable attributes (e.g. hardness, toughness, electrical conductivity, etc.) are hard to specify for the group as a whole. General properties such as high melting temperature, high hardness, poor conductivity, high moduli of elasticity, chemical resistance and low ductility are the norm, with known exceptions to each of these rules (e.g. piezoelectric ceramics, glass transition temperature, superconductive ceramics, etc.). Many composites, such as fiberglass and carbon fiber, while containing ceramic materials, are not considered to be part of the ceramic family.

The earliest ceramics made by humans were pottery objects (i.e. pots or vessels) or figurines made from clay, either by itself or mixed with other materials like silica, hardened, sintered, in fire. The later ones were glazed and fired to create smooth, colored surfaces, decreasing porosity through the use of glassy, amorphous coatings on top of the crystalline ceramic substrates. They now include domestic, industrial and building products, as well as a wide range of ceramic art. In the 20th century, new ceramic materials were developed for use in advanced ceramic engineering, such as in semiconductors.

The word “ceramic” comes from the Greek word κεραμικός (keramikos), “of pottery” or “for pottery”, from κέραμος (keramos), “potter’s clay, tile, pottery”. The earliest known mention of the root “ceram-” is the Mycenaean Greek ke-ra-me-we, “workers of ceramics”, written in Linear B syllabic script. The word may be used as an adjective to describe a material, product or process, or it may be used as a noun, either singular, or, more commonly, as the plural noun “ceramics”.

Hurray! Our FIDELITY REWARD Program is here and is designed to please you!

LEARN MORE