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  • Exquisite pair of Italian cocktail shell armchairs, 1960s

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    Exquisite pair of cocktail shell armchairs made in Italy in the late 1960. This suave shell-shaped items are characteristic for the La Dolce Vita atmoshere of the Italian mid-20th century. The armchairs ware recently restored. The new upholstery maintains the texture and color of the original ones. The legs were re-stained but no other interventions were needed. The items are in good condition and will be the chic accent of any room. They are incredibly comfortable so you just have to take a seat and enjoy your dolce far niente moments.

    400 
  • Sixteen-light geometrical chrome chandelier (Sputnik), 1960s, Italy

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    Spectacular sixteen-light geometrical chrome chandelier made in the 1960s in Italy. Presenting both the characteristics of European rational modernism, as well as those of Space Age design, this chandelier could be a stylish addition to any interior. Part of the large family of Sputnik style ceiling lights, this item has 16 chromed cylinders connected to a central axis in two-tier (8 of them “drawing” an inner circle and 8 of them an outer one). The chandelier is in full working order and in very good vintage condition.

    500 
  • Sale

    Sputnik chandelier with 8 Opaline lampshades, Stilnovo Style, 1950s, IT

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    Spectacular and exquisite ceiling lamp made in Italy in the 1950s. This item is characteristic for the beautiful Stilnovo that touched the Italian design in the 40s and made Italian designers famous for their Mid-Century lighting fixtures. The lamp is made of brass (and white painted brass). The lampshades are made of Opaline.  The piece is kept in good condition and is in full working order. Kept in good vintage condition, it shows just minor traces of use consistent with it’s age (all visible in the photos).

    600  500 
  • Sale
    Clan floor lamp by Harvey Guzzini for Meblo
    Clan floor lamp by Harvey Guzzini for Meblo

    Set of two large Clan floor lamps by Harvey Guzzini for Meblo

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    Set of two large Clan floor lamps by Harvey Guzzini for Meblo. The great modern form emits a beautiful, warm green glow. Soft light is diffused through the graduated tint of the acrylic globe shade. The white acrylic dome top rests in an chromed metal ring frame and lifts to reveal a translucent white interior and a single medium base socket. The lamp rests in a cylindrical fiberglass base which allows directional positioning of the light source.

    If you are interested in buying just one of the two lamps, the price is 500 euros. Please contact us on [email protected] for details.

    Harvey Guzzini is often mistakenly thought to be the name of a lighting designer active in the 1960s and 1970s. But in fact the label belongs to a lighting manufacturing company, which was founded by six Guzzini brothers – Raimondo, Giovanni, Virgilio, Giuseppe, Adolfo and Giannunzio – who were inspired by the 1950 film Harvey starring James Stewart. Compounding the historical record even further, it seems that the Guzzini company rebranded many times in the 20th century, going by, at various points, Harvey Creazioni, Harvey Guzzini, Guzzini, iGuzzini, and Illuminazione Guzzini.

    Harvey Creazioni was originally founded in 1959 in Recanti (on the east central coast of Italy) by Raimondo, focusing on the production of copper-plated decorative objects. Four years later, in June 1963, the six brothers joined together and established Harvey Creazioni di Guzzini, expanding production to include pendant lighting, sconces, and lamps, floor lamps. The brothers employed architect-designer Luigi Massoni—who was introduced to the Guzzini brothers by leading plastic importer Maurizio Adreani—as head of design, branding, public relations, and advertizing.

    Famous Harvey Guzzini designs include Massoni and Luciano Buttura’s Mushroom Table Lamp (1965), as well as the in-house designed Arc Floor Lamp (1968), Faro Table Lamp (1970), and Toledo Table Lamp (1973). Studio 6G, an interning design team, developed the collectible Clan Lamp (1968); and designers Ermanno Lampa and Sergio Brazzoli were responsible for the Nastro Series (1970), Orione Pendant (1970), Sirio Table Lamp (1970), Alba Floor Lamp (1973), Albanella Table Lamp (1973), and Alf Series (1976).

    1.400  800 
  • Sale
    Norwegian Modern coffee table
    Norwegian Modern coffee table

    A beautiful Norwegian table, a Murano fruit bowl and a tulip-spahed crystal candlestick

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    Coffee table made in Norway, late 60s. The counter-top is made of veneered wood; the legs are made of stainless steel with hard plastic clogs. The counter-top edges are cut inwards giving this piece a light non-intrusive look. The legs are not plain, but made of three thin rods. The minimalist shape, the dialogue between wood and stainless steel, the curved edges, the line of the counter-top, all of this make this table a leading exponent of Scandinavian Modern style. The piece is in very good condition.

    Imposing emerald fruit bowl made in Murano in the 1970s. This tall, massive, beautifully colored piece is in very good vintage condition, showing no visible defects. During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past.

    Tulip-spahed crystal candlestick made in Sweden in the 1950s (or early 1960s).

    615  550 
  • Tulip table lamp made in Italy in the 1970s

    Tulip table lamp made in Italy in the 1970s

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    Elegant tulip table lamp made in italy in the 1970s. The base lamp is made of chromed metal and features three cubes that rotate around the central axis. The lampshade, tulip shaped, is made of white opaque glass. Sober, refined and in the same time imposing, this lamp could be the center piece of any table. The item is in full working order and shows only small traces of use.

    150 
  • Face Standard rotary phone made in Italy
    Face Standard rotary phone made in Italy

    Face Standard rotary phone made in Italy

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    Face Standard rotary phone in full working condition. The phone dates from the 1970s, was produced in Italy and is kept in good condition.

    35 
  • “Teardrop” Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s

    “Teardrop” Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s

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    Spectacular Murano sommerso vase for one flower (soliflore) in shades of red (the interior layer), yellow (the median layer) and blue (the outer layer). Because of its shape, this type of vase is also known as “Teardrop”. The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. It has its original label.

    When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important..

    One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    100 
  • Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow
    Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow

    Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow

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    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow. The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration.

    When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important..

    One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    55 
  • Imposing emerald fruit bowl made in Murano in the 1970s

    Imposing emerald fruit bowl made in Murano in the 1970s

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    Imposing emerald fruit bowl made in Murano in the 1970s. This tall, massive, beautifully colored piece is in very good vintage condition, showing no visible defects.

    During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    100 
  • Green bullicante Murano ashtray
    Green bullicante Murano ashtray

    Green bullicante Murano ashtray

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    Beautiful controlled bubbles (bullicante) ashtray made of glass in Murano, Italy, in the 1960s. Hand blown, this pice features the shape of a flower in an amazing shade of translucent emerald green.

    The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects.

    The “bullicante” effect is amongst the most famous glass making techniques and it is seen quite often around the island of Murano. If you’ve had the fortune of strolling along the streets of Venice, you would have noticed beautiful glass pieces with small air bubbles trapped in the inside, possibly stopping to wonder how that seemingly impossible effect is achieved. This peculiar effect is obtained by placing a piece of molten glass inside a metallic mold with spikes, very much resembling a pineapple’s texture. These spikes cause small holes on the surface creating a pattern all around the glass piece. After it’s been left to cool down for a few moments, the whole piece is submerged in molten glass again. This second layer completely covers the first one. However, thanks to the thick consistency of glass, the holes previously impressed on the first layer are not covered, thus causing air to be trapped between both layers of glass. This process can be repeated several times, creating a pattern as complicated as the glass master wishes. This technique gives not only a sense of depth to the whole object, but also an incomparable decorative effect, famous for its originality.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    55 
  • Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s
    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s

    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s

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    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s. Nicely colored in an exquisite purple shade, the bowl features a “half an apple” shape, which has been very popular in Murano since the second half of the 1950s. The bowl is in very good vintage condition.

    During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    30 
  • Green and brown bowl made in Murano, in the 1950s
    Green and brown bowl made in Murano, in the 1950s

    Green and brown bowl made in Murano, in the 1950s

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    Beautiful geode bowl made in Murano, Italy, in the 1950s. Nicely colored, in shades of brown and green, this is a hand blown piece kept in very good vintage condition.

    Murano glass Geode bowls earn the name “geodes” due to their resemblance to geode rocks – rocks or stones that have been sliced neatly in two. The geode bowls therefore have a perfectly flat, wide rim. Murano glass geodes consist of two or more layers of cased glass. They were made my several Italian glass manufacturers from the Venetian island of Murano, and as such it is virtually impossible to identify the maker of an unmarked bowl. Popular geode shapes include circular, square, triangular, figure eight, and kidney shaped among others.

    Source: 20thcenturyglass.com

    50 
  • Sale
    Set of 5 kitchen utensils and appliances
    SEB kitchen timer made in France, in the 1970s

    Set of 5 kitchen utensils and appliances

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    Set of 5 kitchen utensils and appliances. All are in full working order and in good vintage condition.

    • SEB kitchen timer made in France, in the 1970s
    • ACEA juicer made in Italy, in the 1970s
    • SEB electric can opener made in France, in the 1970s
    • Gloria manual mixer made in Germany, in the 1960s
    • COGEBI potato slicer made in Belgium, in the 1970s
    105  75 
  • Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green

    Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green

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    Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green. This piece is remarkable in its fluid shapes, the zoomorphic look (seen from the top, it resembles the image of a cat’s head), the fine quality of the glass, and the dialogue between the three differently colored compartments. Hand blown, this piece is kept in very good vintage condition.

    The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    45 
  • Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s
    Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s

    Murano sommerso vase from the 1950s

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    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in green and purple. The piece is made in the 1950s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. It has the original label.

    When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important..

    One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    75 
  • Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s
    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s

    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s

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    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray made of glass. The piece is distinguished by its fluid shapes, by the fine quality of the glass, as well as by its intense and extremely beautiful ruby red color. Hand blown, this piece is kept in very good vintage condition.

    The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    45 
  • Controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray
    Controlled bubbles (bullincante) Murano ashtray

    Controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray

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    Beautiful controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray made of glass. Hand blown, this piece displays a nice chromatic effect and goes from dark green (to the rim) to clear white (at the bottom).

    The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects.

    The “bullicante” effect is amongst the most famous glass making techniques and it is seen quite often around the island of Murano. If you’ve had the fortune of strolling along the streets of Venice, you would have noticed beautiful glass pieces with small air bubbles trapped in the inside, possibly stopping to wonder how that seemingly impossible effect is achieved. This peculiar effect is obtained by placing a piece of molten glass inside a metallic mold with spikes, very much resembling a pineapple’s texture. These spikes cause small holes on the surface creating a pattern all around the glass piece. After it’s been left to cool down for a few moments, the whole piece is submerged in molten glass again. This second layer completely covers the first one. However, thanks to the thick consistency of glass, the holes previously impressed on the first layer are not covered, thus causing air to be trapped between both layers of glass. This process can be repeated several times, creating a pattern as complicated as the glass master wishes. This technique gives not only a sense of depth to the whole object, but also an incomparable decorative effect, famous for its originality.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    40 
  • Sold out
    Set of 4 "MR" armchairs by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
    Set of 4 "MR" armchairs by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

    Set of 4 “MR” armchairs by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

    Set of 4 “MR” armchairs by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. The armchairs are made of tubular steel and black natural leather and are preserved in a very good shape.

    The architect and designer Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is one of the best-known exponents of International Style modernism. His “less-is-more” philosophy has become a catchphrase for much twentieth-century design, though a preference for luxurious and costly materials often underscores the deceptive simplicity of his elegant and refined designs.

    Mies van der Rohe was the last director of the Bauhaus design school in Dessau, from 1930 until its closing in 1932. In 1938 he left Germany for America, where he headed the architecture department at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

    The graceful, elegant, and beautifully proportioned “MR” armchair, developed from a 1924 design for a cantilevered chair by Mart Stam, was introduced by Mies van der Rohe at the 1927 Stuttgart exhibition and has remained in production ever since. The chair’s cantilevered design uses tubular steel, then a technological novelty, to create an intuitively accessible and ergonomic seat. (When asked why he created chairs with generously sized seats, Mies van der Rohe allegedly replied that he designs chairs he’d be most comfortable sitting in.) The MR Armchair is perfectly balanced, featuring the material innovation and lack of ornamentation that epitomize the International Style. It was awarded the Museum of Modern Art Award in 1977 and the Design Center Stuttgart Award in 1978.

    In 1968 the Knoll group took the license to manufacture these chairs but both before 1968 and afterwards many factories have in fact produced these iconic pieces.

    1.000  790 
  • Sold out

    Pair of Diamond Chairs designed by Harry Bertoia, Italy, 1980s

    Pair of Diamond Chairs designed by Harry Bertoia and produced in Italy in the 1980s. One of the chairs has a pink suede upholstery. The other is in a light blue one. The items are in overall good vintage condition, with only small traces of use, all visible in the photos. This chairs are icons of the Italian Modern Design, becoming best-sellers right after their release on the market.

    800 
  • Sold out
    9 lights brass chandelier made in Italy, in the 1950s
    9 lights brass chandelier made in Italy, in the 1950s

    9 lights brass chandelier made in Italy, in the 1940s

    Elegant yet spectacular 9 lights radial chandelier made in Italy, in the late 1940s or early 1950s. This radial chandelier features 9 arms made of brass with shades made of glass and black metal fixtures. It is in its original condition and displays all the major characteristics of International Style / Mid-Century design, alongside with reminiscences of Stile Liberty and Art Deco. An exquisite piece, resembling a bouquet of tulips. The chandelier is kept in good condition.

    Italy’s Stile Liberty took its name from the British department store Liberty, the colorful textiles of which were particularly popular in Italy. Notable Italian designers included Galileo Chini, whose ceramics were inspired both by majolica patterns and by Art Nouveau. He was later known as a painter and a scenic designer; he designed the sets for two Puccini operas Gianni Schicchi and Turnadot. The Teatro Massimo in Palermo, by the architect Ernesto Basile, is an example of the Italian variant of the style, architectural style, which combined Art Nouveau and classical elements. The most important figure in Italian Art Nouveau furniture design was Carlo Bugatti, the son of an architect and sculptor, and brother of the famous automobile designer. He studied at the Milanese Academy of Brera, and later the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Paris. His work was distinguished by its exoticism and eccentricity, included silverware, textiles, ceramics, and musical instruments, but he is best remembered for his innovative furniture designs, shown first in the 1888 Milan Fine Arts Fair. His furniture often featured a keyhole design, and had unusual coverings, including parchment and silk, and inlays of bone and ivory. It also sometimes had surprising organic shapes, copied after snails and cobras.

    600  480 
  • Sold out
    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase
    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase

    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase

    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in red and blue. The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration.

    When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important..

    One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    110 
  • Sold out
    Green & brown Murano fruit bowl made in the 1950s
    Green & brown Murano fruit bowl made in the 1950s

    Green & brown Murano fruit bowl made in the 1950s

    Green & brown Murano fruit bowl made in the 1950s. Of considerable size and, at the same time, remarked by the suppleness of its lines and silhouette, this fruit bowl (kept in very good vintage condition) can successfully be the central piece of any table.

    During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past.

    Source: glassofvenice.com

    110 
  • Sold out
    Beautiful pair of Mid-Century armchairs made in Italy in the 1950s
    Beautiful pair of Mid-Century armchairs made in Italy in the 1950s

    Beautiful pair of Mid-Century armchairs made in Italy in the 1950s

    Beautiful pair of Mid-Century armchairs made in Italy in the 1950s. Featuring incredibly refined and stylish wooden arm posts and legs, the armchairs have been recently restored and have new upholstery. Also, the strong contrast between the color of the upholstery and the dark wooden elements offers a sophisticated yet modern look. This pair is in great condition and can accommodate an elegant living room, hallway or salon.

    500 
  • Sold out
    Murano orange fruit bowl

    Murano orange fruit bowl

    Impressive fruit bowl made in Murano in the second half of the 1950s. The piece distinguishes itself through the transparency of the orange pigment, which goes up to red at certain times of the day when light is favorable. The irregular shape – of natural inspiration – radiates from the center. A rare piece, kept in excellent condition.

    110 

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