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  • 700 

    Tulip side table with two base stool by Maurice Burke for Arkana

    , ,
    Iconic 1970’s coffee set furniture which would grace any house apartment for its simple, clean, and stylish lines but also for the very small space it occupies. Cast aluminum base and circular laminate top (for table). The stools are upholstered with blue and yellow fabric specific to the period. Table dimensions: height = 52 cm, top diameter = 45cm. Stools dimensions: height = 43 cm, seat diameter = 40 cm. Stamped to underside of base Arkana No 12. The items show slight signs of wear consistent with age and use,  with small chips of paint on sidewise of the top table (please see the photos) and a lovely patina of time.
    700 
    700 
  • “Teardrop” Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s
    100 

    “Teardrop” Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s

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    Spectacular Murano sommerso vase for one flower (soliflore) in shades of red (the interior layer), yellow (the median layer) and blue (the outer layer). Because of its shape, this type of vase is also known as "Teardrop". The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. It has its original label. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    100 
    100 
  • Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow
    Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow
    55 

    Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow

    ,
    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow. The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    55 
    55 
  • Sold out
    450 

    Scandinavian Mid-Century armchair with headrest, 1970s

    Comfortable and elegant Mid-Century armchair made in the 1970s. Displaying a beautiful Scandinavian design aesthetic, this item features an interesting U-shaped armrest made in wood and renewed mustard upholstery (fireproof hotel & restaurant safe). The chromed supports of the headrest are a modern touch. The item is in very good vintage condition with no defects.
    450 
    450 
  • Sold out
    300 

    Colourful tripod floor lamp, 1960s, Italy

    Beautiful and colourful tripod floor lamp made in the late 1960s in Italy. The lamp is made of metal. With a black body and a yellow and red lampshade, this item is a joyful presence in any room. Designed in the philosophy of Space Age, this item is very slim and discreet. It is in full working state. All the minor defects (consistent with its age) are visible in the photos.
    300 
    300 
  • Sold out
    Space Age UFO ceiling lamp made in Germany
    Space Age UFO ceiling lamp made in Germany
    350  220 

    Space Age UFO ceiling lamp made in Germany, in the 1960s

    Spectacular UFO Space Age ceiling light made in Germany, in the mid 20th century. The light consists of two plates of yellow glass with geometric decorations (black lines). Made in the 1960s and resembling an UFO, this is a representative piece fort the aesthetics of the Space Race era. The Space Age is a time period encompassing the activities related to the Space Race, space exploration, space technology, and the cultural developments influenced by these events. The Space Age is generally considered to have begun with Sputnik (1957). During the 1950s, architecture, furniture, interior design, cars, and gadget design took on a curiously spaceflight-inspired aesthetic.
    350  220 
    350  220 
  • Sold out
    500 

    Teak & leather armchair by Gustav Thams for Vejen Polstermobelfabrik, 1960s, DK

    A beautiful teak and leather armchair designed by Gustav Thams for Vejen Polstermobelfabrik. The armchair was designed and produced in the 1960s in Denmark. The natural leather  yellow cushions are elaborately sewn in a wedge shape and fit perfectly to the frame thanks to the hooks on the backrest. The frame is made of solid teak with an oiled surface. The armrests are rounded (in the characteristic organic look of the Scandinavian Modern). The armchair is in good vintage condition and shows just minor traces of use (see photos). The original label is well preserved.
    500 
    500 
  • Sold out
    1.100 

    Danish Minerva Daybed by Peter Hvidt & Orla Mølgaard-Nielsen for France & Son, 1957

    Beautiful late 1950s Danish modern daybed (Model Minerva), designed by Peter Hvidt & Orla Mølgaard Nielsen, produced by France & Son. The item features a teak wooden frame and renewed mustard upholstery. The minimalist look of this sofa is characteristic for the Scandinavian design of that era and can easily fit any contemporary interior.
    1.100 
    1.100 
  • Sold out
    Atomic Age ceramic ceiling lamp made in Germany
    Atomic Age ceramic ceiling lamp made in Germany
    125  100 

    Atomic Age ceramic ceiling lamp made in Germany

    Atomic Age pendant ceiling lamp made in Germany, in the late 1960s or early 1970s. The lamp shade is made of glazed ceramic. The vivid colors (of earth and fire), the organic lines and the circular shape, all shows the influence of the Atomic/Space Age aesthetics. The cord is adjustable. Atomic Age in design refers to the period roughly corresponding to 1940–1960 and extending in the 1970s, when concerns about nuclear war dominated Western society during the Cold War. The discovery and development of the Electron microscope had also a huge impact. Architecture, industrial design, commercial design (including advertising), interior design, and fine arts were all influenced by the themes of atomic science, as well as the Space Age, which coincided with that period. Atomic Age design became popular and instantly recognizable, with a use of atomic motifs and space age symbols. Retrofuturism is a current resurgence of interest in Atomic Age design. Free-form organic shapes also appear as a recurring theme in Atomic Age design, reflecting x-ray technology that was becoming more widespread and familiar in pop culture. These botanic designs influenced later Atomic Age patterns that included repeating organic shapes similar to cells and organisms viewed through a microscope. Vital forms, or abstract organic forms, were identified as a core motif.
    125  100 
    125  100 
  • Sold out
    200 

    Space Age ceiling lamp made in Germany, in the 1960s

    Beautiful Space Age ceiling lamp made in Germany in the 1960s. The lamp is made of metal. Yellow on the outside with a white inside and a silver decorative ring, this item is quite joyful and features nice, clean modernist lines. The piece have some minor signs of wear, consistent with its age and a regular use; all this little defects are visible in the photos.
    200 
    200 
  • Sold out
    Corner sideboard with rolling shutters
    Corner sideboard with rolling shutters
    290  240 

    Corner sideboard with rolling shutters

    Corner sideboard with rolling shutters. Can be used as a TV stand or minibar and is made in Germany, in the late 1940s or early 1950s. The contrast between the dark brown and acacia color are specific for the German furniture design of that period and creates a nice chromatic game. The sides and top are decorated with brass rods. Inside, the rolling shutters hide behind a double wall when open (so the storage space is completely void). The piece was recently restored and is in very good shape.
    290  240 
    290  240 
  • Sold out
    Coffee table with brass clogs and formica top
    100 

    Coffee table with brass clogs and Formica top

    Small coffee table manufactured in the 1970s. The table has a minimalist, elegant and sober design. The yellow top, made of Formica, features a nice geometric design and a nice brass decoration. The flared legs have brass clogs. They are flexible so the table would be stable even if the floor has some irregularities. The piece is in very good vintage condition showing just some small traces of use in one sector of the top (see photo).
    100 
    100 
  • Sold out
    Atomic Age yellow table lamp made in Germany
    75 

    Atomic Age yellow table lamp made in Germany

    Atomic Age yellow table lamp made in Germany, in the 1970s. The angle and height of the shade is adjustable along the structure of the lamp. The materials (metal, plastic, etc.), the colors (chrome, bright yellow, black accents) and the shape of this beautiful lamp are all typical for the Atomic/Space Age design, which marked the aesthetics of the 1970s. The piece is in good vintage condition. Atomic Age in design refers to the period roughly corresponding to 1940–1960 and extending in the 1970s, when concerns about nuclear war dominated Western society during the Cold War. The discovery and development of the Electron microscope had also a huge impact. Architecture, industrial design, commercial design (including advertising), interior design, and fine arts were all influenced by the themes of atomic science, as well as the Space Age, which coincided with that period. Atomic Age design became popular and instantly recognizable, with a use of atomic motifs and space age symbols. Retrofuturism is a current resurgence of interest in Atomic Age design.
    75 
    75