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  • 200 

    Banmuller LAMA chaise longue, adjustable chrome tubular structure, removable footrest, 1970s

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    Comfortable and beautiful Banmuller LAMA chaise longue made in 1970s in Germany. The chair is adjustable in height and has a removable footrest. It is made of chrome tubular structure and features the original orange upholstery. The chair is made by Baumuller with LAMA tubular bent metal chromed components made in Italy. The item is in good vintage condition and shows only minor traces of use consistent with its age.
    200 
    200 
  • 100 

    Space Age Bubble Pendant in Translucent Orange, 1970s, France

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    Beautiful bubble pendant in bright translucent orange made in France in the 1970s. The pendant displays the clean yet futuristic lines of the Space Age design. It shows some minor signs of wear, consistent with its age (see photos) but is in overall good shape and in full working order. The height of the cord can be adjusted so this item can fit any room.
    100 
    100 
  • 400 

    Exquisite pair of Italian cocktail shell armchairs, 1960s

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    Exquisite pair of cocktail shell armchairs made in Italy in the late 1960. This suave shell-shaped items are characteristic for the La Dolce Vita atmoshere of the Italian mid-20th century. The armchairs ware recently restored. The new upholstery maintains the texture and color of the original ones. The legs were re-stained but no other interventions were needed. The items are in good condition and will be the chic accent of any room. They are incredibly comfortable so you just have to take a seat and enjoy your dolce far niente moments.
    400 
    400 
  • 450 

    Scandinavian Mid-Century armchair with headrest, 1970s

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    Comfortable and elegant Mid-Century armchair made in the 1970s. Displaying a beautiful Scandinavian design aesthetic, this item features an interesting U-shaped armrest made in wood and renewed mustard upholstery (fireproof hotel & restaurant safe). The chromed supports of the headrest are a modern touch. The item is in very good vintage condition with no defects.
    450 
    450 
  • Sale
    Eve floor lamp made in the 1970s
    Eve floor lamp made in the 1970s
    300  200 

    Eve floor lamp made in the 1970s

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    Beautiful Eve floor lamp made in France in the 1970s. The tube is made of chromed metal and the lamp shade is made of acryl. Featuring the aesthetics of Atomic Age design, this item is in an overall good condition, showing only some age related scratches on the base and a little bend on the shade (see photos). The lamp has its original labels.
    300  200 
    300  200 
  • Set of two opaline cups made in Belgium, in the 1970s
    60 

    Set of two opaline cups made in Belgium, in the 1970s

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    Set of two beautiful ice cream (or sherbet) cups made of glass and opaline and produced in Belgium, in the 1970s. Colored in bright vivid orange, this cups features the Atomic Age aesthetics. The cups are in very good vintage shape. Atomic Age in design refers to the period roughly corresponding to 1940–1960 and extending in the 1970s, when concerns about nuclear war dominated Western society during the Cold War. The discovery and development of the Electron microscope had also a huge impact. Architecture, industrial design, commercial design (including advertising), interior design, and fine arts were all influenced by the themes of atomic science, as well as the Space Age, which coincided with that period. Atomic Age design became popular and instantly recognizable, with a use of atomic motifs and space age symbols. Retrofuturism is a current resurgence of interest in Atomic Age design. Free-form organic shapes also appear as a recurring theme in Atomic Age design, reflecting x-ray technology that was becoming more widespread and familiar in pop culture. These botanic designs influenced later Atomic Age patterns that included repeating organic shapes similar to cells and organisms viewed through a microscope. Vital forms, or abstract organic forms, were identified as a core motif.
    60 
    60 
  • Sale
    Beautiful Val St Lambert crystal lamp
    Beautiful Val St Lambert crystal lamp
    300  200 

    Beautiful Val St Lambert crystal lamp

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    Spectacular table lamp signed Val Saint Lambert. This hand-made piece is made in the 1960s by the most prominent crystal manufacturer in Benelux, official supplier to H.M. the King of Belgium. Signed on the bottom, "Val St. Lambert". Still has the original label. The piece is in a very good condition. History of Val St. Lambert: In June 1826, smoke was rising from the chimney of the Cistercian abbey in Seraing, near Liège: the first furnace of the Val Saint Lambert Crystal Works had just been fired up. Val Saint Lambert would rapidly emerge as the epicentre of the Belgian crystal industry. For all the preconditions for a successful industry were met: the vicinity to the Meuse, a coal-rich region, a rail network, and even the enormous monastery facilities, which were ideally suited for artistic and craft activities on a large scale. The end of the 19th century ushered in a golden age for Val Saint Lambert. The site around the former abbey expanded into an impressive village with more than 180 worker dwellings, with small gardens, a school, a shop, and even a hospital. In the crystal works, by now world famous, some 5,000 employees produced 120,000 unique crystal creations each day. World War I brought an abrupt end to the expansion. Several key markets disappeared: the Balkans, the Russian tsars and Germany. The great depression of 1929 and the bombardment of World War II meant a further decline for the crystal works. This situation lasted up to the 1960s and 1970s, before two major innovations breathed new life into Val Saint Lambert: the introduction of the diamond disc for better cutting and engraving, and the replacement of the traditional pot furnace by a bath furnace, which melted solid raw materials into liquid glass. From the 1970s the company’s history is marked by several restructurings and takeovers. Today, the Val Saint Lambert Crystal Works are in the hands of the Onclin family, which aspires to reinstate the brand on a global level. Source: val-saint-lambert.com
    300  200 
    300  200 
  • “Teardrop” Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s
    100 

    “Teardrop” Murano sommerso vase from the 1960s

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    Spectacular Murano sommerso vase for one flower (soliflore) in shades of red (the interior layer), yellow (the median layer) and blue (the outer layer). Because of its shape, this type of vase is also known as "Teardrop". The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. It has its original label. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    100 
    100 
  • Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow
    Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow
    55 

    Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow

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    Beautiful Murano sommerso vase in blue and yellow. The piece is made in the 1960s and is kept in very good condition, showing no visible deterioration. When thinking of Murano glass, it is highly unlikely that we think of sand, yet this rare material is at the base of all glass production. Glass is firstly a mix of siliceous sand, soda, lime and potassium, which is put to melt inside an oven at a temperature of around 1.500 Celsius. After it has become flexible enough, it is removed with a pipe that will be used to blow the glass out while the glassmaker shapes and models it. The forms and colors given to each piece depend on the tools and chemicals used during its production. The techniques are also important.. One of the most common techniques is “Sommerso”, which in Italian literally means “submerged”. This technique is used to create several layers of glass (usually with different contrasting colors) inside a single object, giving the illusion of “immersed” colors that lay on top of each other without mixing. This is done by uniting different layers of glass through heat and repeatedly immersing them in pots of molten colored glass. This technique is quite recognizable: it is characterized by an outer layer of colorless glass and thick layers of colored glass inside it, as if a big drop of color had been captured inside the transparent glass. When one first sees these objects, it seems almost impossible to conceive such beautiful colors being locked so perfectly inside what would seem solid glass, and then undoubtedly one begins to wonder how ever did they manage to achieve such a complex game of shapes and colors right in the middle of a clear glass object. Source: glassofvenice.com
    55 
    55 
  • Green bullicante Murano ashtray
    Green bullicante Murano ashtray
    55 

    Green bullicante Murano ashtray

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    Beautiful controlled bubbles (bullicante) ashtray made of glass in Murano, Italy, in the 1960s. Hand blown, this pice features the shape of a flower in an amazing shade of translucent emerald green. The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects. The “bullicante” effect is amongst the most famous glass making techniques and it is seen quite often around the island of Murano. If you’ve had the fortune of strolling along the streets of Venice, you would have noticed beautiful glass pieces with small air bubbles trapped in the inside, possibly stopping to wonder how that seemingly impossible effect is achieved. This peculiar effect is obtained by placing a piece of molten glass inside a metallic mold with spikes, very much resembling a pineapple’s texture. These spikes cause small holes on the surface creating a pattern all around the glass piece. After it’s been left to cool down for a few moments, the whole piece is submerged in molten glass again. This second layer completely covers the first one. However, thanks to the thick consistency of glass, the holes previously impressed on the first layer are not covered, thus causing air to be trapped between both layers of glass. This process can be repeated several times, creating a pattern as complicated as the glass master wishes. This technique gives not only a sense of depth to the whole object, but also an incomparable decorative effect, famous for its originality. Source: glassofvenice.com
    55 
    55 
  • Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s
    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s
    30 

    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s

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    Small purple Murano bowl made in the 1970s. Nicely colored in an exquisite purple shade, the bowl features a "half an apple" shape, which has been very popular in Murano since the second half of the 1950s. The bowl is in very good vintage condition. During World War II the industry did not thrive, but as soon as the war was over the glass masters of Murano returned to their art and created pieces deeply rooted in interior design trends of that time with focus on minimalism, functionality, and simplicity. To support these trends Murano artists and artisans returned to techniques of the past such as filigree, murrino, and lattimo. From that point onwards Murano saw continued exploration of styles and techniques striving to find a happy medium between the technical mastery and the outline, color, and decoration. The resulting continuous innovation led to a rise in popularity and to multiple prizes at various international art exhibitions. Thanks to such prominent artists as Archimede Seguso, Ludovico and Laura De Santillana, Tobia Scarpa, Ercole Barovier, Fulvio Bianconi, Toni Zuccheri, Romano Chrivi, Giampaolo Martinuzzi, and Alfredo Barbini, Murano again became known as the glassblowing capital of the world. Murano now created the art trends as opposed to following them in the years past. Source: glassofvenice.com
    30 
    30 
  • Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green
    45 

    Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green

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    Tricolor Murano ashtray (or dish) in blue, red and green. This piece is remarkable in its fluid shapes, the zoomorphic look (seen from the top, it resembles the image of a cat's head), the fine quality of the glass, and the dialogue between the three differently colored compartments. Hand blown, this piece is kept in very good vintage condition. The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects. Source: glassofvenice.com
    45 
    45 
  • Sale
    Ceramic orange glazed table lamp made in Denmark
    Ceramic orange glazed table lamp made in Denmark
    125  100 

    Ceramic orange glazed table lamp made in Denmark

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    Beautiful ceramic table lamp made in Denmark in the 1960s. The base lamp, made of ceramic, is distinguished by the play between the vivid orange glazed top and the naked clay (without glaze)  brown bottom. Both the color and the technique are specific to the period. The piece is kept in a very good condition, without visible defects and has all it's original elements (lightbulb socket, switch, electric cord, plug).
    125  100 
    125  100 
  • Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s
    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s
    45 

    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray from the 1960s

    ,
    Spectacular Murano cigar ashtray made of glass. The piece is distinguished by its fluid shapes, by the fine quality of the glass, as well as by its intense and extremely beautiful ruby red color. Hand blown, this piece is kept in very good vintage condition. The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects. Source: glassofvenice.com
    45 
    45 
  • Controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray
    Controlled bubbles (bullincante) Murano ashtray
    40 

    Controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray

    ,
    Beautiful controlled bubbles (bullicante) Murano ashtray made of glass. Hand blown, this piece displays a nice chromatic effect and goes from dark green (to the rim) to clear white (at the bottom). The quality and tradition that characterize Murano’s finest glass furnaces have always been worthy of the highest appreciation. This prestige is due mostly to the glass masters’ hard work and dedication, which are the very core of Murano’s most famous trade. Glassmaking has been passed on from one generation to the next one, with constant innovations and timeless originality. The loyalty and respect with which this trade is treated is possibly the key to Murano’s success. Glass masters all over the island have always worked with endless vitality, and this creative vein is evident in every glass artwork that comes out of any furnace, with improved techniques and bewildering effects. The “bullicante” effect is amongst the most famous glass making techniques and it is seen quite often around the island of Murano. If you’ve had the fortune of strolling along the streets of Venice, you would have noticed beautiful glass pieces with small air bubbles trapped in the inside, possibly stopping to wonder how that seemingly impossible effect is achieved. This peculiar effect is obtained by placing a piece of molten glass inside a metallic mold with spikes, very much resembling a pineapple’s texture. These spikes cause small holes on the surface creating a pattern all around the glass piece. After it’s been left to cool down for a few moments, the whole piece is submerged in molten glass again. This second layer completely covers the first one. However, thanks to the thick consistency of glass, the holes previously impressed on the first layer are not covered, thus causing air to be trapped between both layers of glass. This process can be repeated several times, creating a pattern as complicated as the glass master wishes. This technique gives not only a sense of depth to the whole object, but also an incomparable decorative effect, famous for its originality. Source: glassofvenice.com
    40 
    40 

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