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Atomic & Space Age

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  • Set of two opaline cups made in Belgium, in the 1970s
    60 

    Set of two opaline cups made in Belgium, in the 1970s

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    Set of two beautiful ice cream (or sherbet) cups made of glass and opaline and produced in Belgium, in the 1970s. Colored in bright vivid orange, this cups features the Atomic Age aesthetics. The cups are in very good vintage shape. Atomic Age in design refers to the period roughly corresponding to 1940–1960 and extending in the 1970s, when concerns about nuclear war dominated Western society during the Cold War. The discovery and development of the Electron microscope had also a huge impact. Architecture, industrial design, commercial design (including advertising), interior design, and fine arts were all influenced by the themes of atomic science, as well as the Space Age, which coincided with that period. Atomic Age design became popular and instantly recognizable, with a use of atomic motifs and space age symbols. Retrofuturism is a current resurgence of interest in Atomic Age design. Free-form organic shapes also appear as a recurring theme in Atomic Age design, reflecting x-ray technology that was becoming more widespread and familiar in pop culture. These botanic designs influenced later Atomic Age patterns that included repeating organic shapes similar to cells and organisms viewed through a microscope. Vital forms, or abstract organic forms, were identified as a core motif.
    60 
    60 
  • Sale
    Smoky Selandia dish by Per Lütken
    Smoky Selandia dish by Per Lütken
    300  220 

    Smoky Selandia dish by Per Lütken

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    Selandia was designed by Per Lütken in the spring of 1957. The dish was fashioned by hand, and its shape is created when the glass blower carefully turns, raises and lowers the hot glass. The visual softness contained in the glass at 1400 degrees Celsius can be seen directly in the cooled, transparent version of the dish. The dish is decorated by engraving/glass cutting. Identified and dated on the bottom, “Holmegaard 19PL59” (Per Lütken signed almost always monogrammed with initials falling between the 4 digits of the year).
    300  220 
    300  220 
  • Magnetic Ball wall lamp by Benny Frandsen
    Magnetic Ball wall lamp by Benny Frandsen
    50 

    Magnetic Ball wall lamp by Benny Frandsen

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    Famous magnetic Ball wall lamp designed by Benny Frandsen in the late 1960s, the lamp that led to the founding of the ABO Randers A/S company. It is in a very good shape, with only small age-related traces. This wall light enroll in both the Scandinavian Modern and Space Race aesthetics, being an icon of European design in the second half of the 20th century. Benny Frandsen (b. 1941, named after jazz-clarinetist Benny Goodman) is a Danish designer and lighting producer. He was educated as an electronics engineer but his passion was to design light. By 1966, he had already designed some lamps for a discotheque, and then Frandsen tried to convince his boss to start a lighting production, but no luck. Afterwards, Benny Frandsen established Frandsen Lamps in 1968, by himself, and was located in his home in Skanderborg in Jutland. He designed geometric lamps, but the business was slow. Frandsen discovered that, the Danes wanted round lamps and not geometric lamps, so he began designing a round light instead. Here emerges the ultimate round lamp, a ball that was attached to a wall bracket with a magnet. This was a game changer for Frandsen. Everybody wanted the Ball wall lamp with magnet. Since then, there has been made many variations of this Ball lamp. In 1972, Frandsen starts a factory in Skanderborg, to keep up with the many requests. But by 1993 the company is sold to the Frits Concern, whom merges the lighting production with Lyskilde. This led to Frandsen winning the role of the director, under the new company name, Frandsen Lyskilde. Eventually Benny Frandsen buys the company back in 1996, as the Frits Concern closes, and reestablishes Frandsen Lighting.  
    50 
    50 
  • Sale
    Little Akva bowl by Per Lütken
    Little Akva bowl by Per Lütken
    50  35 

    Little Akva Askebæger bowl by Per Lütken

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    Aqua bowl designed by Per Lütken for Holmegaard. This model is part of the Akva series, which was a huge success and remained in production for more than two decades between 1953 and 1974. Signed and identified on the bottom, “HOLMEGAARD PL”. Also on bottom has the production number, 15737. Has a small chip on the rim and some age-related marks. However, all in all it is in a good vintage condition. A rare piece made from hand-blown crystal (just a small part of this series was made from crystal and not from glass). The Akva series includes items sold under different trade marks and line names: Askebaeger, Dukling, Fiona, Hellas, Lysestage, Menuet, Rondo, Selandia, Thule, Umanak, Surf etc.
    50  35 
    50  35 
  • Sold out
    Eve floor lamp made in the 1970s
    Eve floor lamp made in the 1970s
    300  200 

    Eve floor lamp made in the 1970s

    Beautiful Eve floor lamp made in France in the 1970s. The tube is made of chromed metal and the lamp shade is made of acryl. Featuring the aesthetics of Atomic Age design, this item is in an overall good condition, showing only some age related scratches on the base and a little bend on the shade (see photos). The lamp has its original labels.
    300  200 
    300  200